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(1827 results for Brief Intervention Approach)

Brief Intervention Approach

Brief intervention is an evidence-based method designed to motivate individuals at risk of substance abuse and related health problems to change behaviors. Brief sessions can help individuals understand how substance use puts them at risk and encourage strategies for reducing substance use or abstaining. Healthcare providers may also use brief interventions to urge those with more serious dependence to enter intensive treatment within a primary care setting or a specialized alcohol and drug treatment facility.

In primary care settings, brief interventions last 5 minutes for brief advice, while brief counseling sessions can last 15 to 30 minutes. Brief interventions are not intended for clients with serious substance addictions, but rather to treat problematic or risky substance use (e.g. binge drinking). The two most common behavioral therapies used in brief intervention are modified versions of cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, or a combination of the two.

Brief Intervention versus Brief Therapy

Sometimes, brief intervention and brief therapy are considered elements in a continuum of care, but they have distinguishing characteristics. The general goal of brief intervention is to motivate a client to perform a particular action (e.g. to enter treatment, change a behavior or think differently about a situation), whereas therapy is used to address larger concerns (e.g. altering one’s personality, maintaining abstinence or addressing long-standing problems that exacerbate substance abuse). Other key differences between brief intervention and therapy include:

– Length of sessions (5 minutes for each intervention versus 60 minutes for each therapy session)
– Extensiveness of assessment (more in depth for therapy than intervention)
– Setting (nontraditional treatment settings such as a social service or primary care setting for intervention versus traditional substance abuse treatment settings for therapy)
– Personnel delivering the treatment (brief interventions can be administered by a wide range of professionals; therapy requires training in specific therapeutic modalities)
– Materials and media used (materials such as written booklets or computer programs may be used in the delivery of interventions, but not in therapies)

Brief interventions can help clients reduce or stop abuse, act as a first step in the treatment process to determine if clients can abstain or decrease use themselves or act as a method to change specific behaviors before or during treatment. The primary goal for clients regardless of setting is to reduce the risk of harm to themselves, their families and the community.

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More on Brief Intervention Approach

Brief intervention is an evidence-based method designed to motivate individuals at risk of substance abuse and related health problems to change behaviors. Brief sessions can help individuals understand how substance use puts them at risk and encourage strategies for reducing substance use or abstaining. Healthcare providers may also use brief interventions to urge those with more serious dependence to enter intensive treatment within a primary care setting or a specialized alcohol and drug treatment facility.

In primary care settings, brief interventions last 5 minutes for brief advice, while brief counseling sessions can last 15 to 30 minutes. Brief interventions are not intended for clients with serious substance addictions, but rather to treat problematic or risky substance use (e.g. binge drinking). The two most common behavioral therapies used in brief intervention are modified versions of cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, or a combination of the two.

Brief Intervention versus Brief Therapy

Sometimes, brief intervention and brief therapy are considered elements in a continuum of care, but they have distinguishing characteristics. The general goal of brief intervention is to motivate a client to perform a particular action (e.g. to enter treatment, change a behavior or think differently about a situation), whereas therapy is used to address larger concerns (e.g. altering one’s personality, maintaining abstinence or addressing long-standing problems that exacerbate substance abuse). Other key differences between brief intervention and therapy include:

– Length of sessions (5 minutes for each intervention versus 60 minutes for each therapy session)
– Extensiveness of assessment (more in depth for therapy than intervention)
– Setting (nontraditional treatment settings such as a social service or primary care setting for intervention versus traditional substance abuse treatment settings for therapy)
– Personnel delivering the treatment (brief interventions can be administered by a wide range of professionals; therapy requires training in specific therapeutic modalities)
– Materials and media used (materials such as written booklets or computer programs may be used in the delivery of interventions, but not in therapies)

Brief interventions can help clients reduce or stop abuse, act as a first step in the treatment process to determine if clients can abstain or decrease use themselves or act as a method to change specific behaviors before or during treatment. The primary goal for clients regardless of setting is to reduce the risk of harm to themselves, their families and the community.

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