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(1234 results for Contingency Management/Motivational Incentive)

Contingency Management/Motivational Incentive

Research conducted during the 1960s to 1980s analyzed the role of contingency management (CM) as a strategy for reinforcing abstinence in alcoholics and attaining other treatment goals such as medication compliance and treatment attendance. CM has expanded since its implementation for alcoholism to treat a wide variety of addictions. CM is usually included as part of a comprehensive treatment plan in context with other psychosocial and pharmacological interventions.

Four Key Principles Carried Out by the Clinician

1. Arranging regular testing to ensure the client’s substance use is properly detected
2. Providing agreed-upon tangible reinforcers when abstinence is demonstrated
3. Withholding designated incentives when substance use is detected
4. Assistance in establishing alternate and healthier activities (e.g. enjoyable social and recreational activities) to replace reinforcements derived from substance abuse

Providing clients with motivational incentives is key to reinforcing positive behaviors such as abstinence – or conversely – withholding rewards if clients do not meet goals. For example, positive consequences of abstinence might include receipt of vouchers whereas negative consequences of drinking might include withholding vouchers or providing an unfavorable report to a parole officer. Other reinforcers (incentives) include special privileges, cash, methadone doses and prizes.

Vouchers are often used to augment other community-based treatments for adults who abuse opioids (especially heroin), stimulants (especially cocaine) or both. The client receives a voucher for every drug-free urine sample provided. The voucher has monetary value exchangeable for food items, movie passes or other goods/services appropriate for a drug-free lifestyle. In many CM models, the value of the earned vouchers escalates as the client demonstrates consecutively longer periods of abstinence. Typically, the voucher values start out low, but increase as the number of consecutive drug-free urine samples increases. Conversely, positive urine samples reset the value of the vouchers to the initial low value. Vouchers have been found to be effective in promoting abstinence from opioids and cocaine in clients undergoing methadone-based detoxification.

Research indicates alcohol and other substance abuse treatments incorporating CM are more effective than standard case management, 12-step-oriented counseling and behavioral therapies delivered without a CM component. Although CM is generally effective, proper implementation is important. Treatment staff need to monitor individuals frequently and provide reinforcers consistently.

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More on Contingency Management/Motivational Incentive

Research conducted during the 1960s to 1980s analyzed the role of contingency management (CM) as a strategy for reinforcing abstinence in alcoholics and attaining other treatment goals such as medication compliance and treatment attendance. CM has expanded since its implementation for alcoholism to treat a wide variety of addictions. CM is usually included as part of a comprehensive treatment plan in context with other psychosocial and pharmacological interventions.

Four Key Principles Carried Out by the Clinician

1. Arranging regular testing to ensure the client’s substance use is properly detected
2. Providing agreed-upon tangible reinforcers when abstinence is demonstrated
3. Withholding designated incentives when substance use is detected
4. Assistance in establishing alternate and healthier activities (e.g. enjoyable social and recreational activities) to replace reinforcements derived from substance abuse

Providing clients with motivational incentives is key to reinforcing positive behaviors such as abstinence – or conversely – withholding rewards if clients do not meet goals. For example, positive consequences of abstinence might include receipt of vouchers whereas negative consequences of drinking might include withholding vouchers or providing an unfavorable report to a parole officer. Other reinforcers (incentives) include special privileges, cash, methadone doses and prizes.

Vouchers are often used to augment other community-based treatments for adults who abuse opioids (especially heroin), stimulants (especially cocaine) or both. The client receives a voucher for every drug-free urine sample provided. The voucher has monetary value exchangeable for food items, movie passes or other goods/services appropriate for a drug-free lifestyle. In many CM models, the value of the earned vouchers escalates as the client demonstrates consecutively longer periods of abstinence. Typically, the voucher values start out low, but increase as the number of consecutive drug-free urine samples increases. Conversely, positive urine samples reset the value of the vouchers to the initial low value. Vouchers have been found to be effective in promoting abstinence from opioids and cocaine in clients undergoing methadone-based detoxification.

Research indicates alcohol and other substance abuse treatments incorporating CM are more effective than standard case management, 12-step-oriented counseling and behavioral therapies delivered without a CM component. Although CM is generally effective, proper implementation is important. Treatment staff need to monitor individuals frequently and provide reinforcers consistently.

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