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(739 results for Housing Services)

Housing Services

People with mental illness and/or substance use disorders often have precarious housing situations, making them particularly vulnerable to homelessness. In January 2014, one in five people experiencing homelessness had a serious mental illness, with a similar percentage suffering from a chronic substance use disorder. A safe and secure place to live and access to services are essential to recovery. They enable people with mental illness and/or substance use disorders to live as independently as possible.

Important Factors

Affordability: Ideally, housing should not cost more than 30% of one’s income, otherwise an individual will have difficulty paying for other daily necessities. To meet housing costs, some people need additional financial assistance such as government-funded rental assistance or subsidies.

Independence: Housing should provide individuals the freedom to choose where and what type of housing they want. To a great extent, this is dictated by a person’s behavioral and physical capabilities and disabilities, but should be the least restrictive, most independent setting to match one’s needs. If a person has physical disabilities, ramps and other modifications need to be in place.

Discrimination-free: The Fair Housing Act bars discrimination in rental housing based on disability, therefore landlords and property owners cannot refuse to rent to a person because of a disability. Allowing reasonable accommodations and modifications to a dwelling to fit a disabled person’s needs is protected by federal law.

Types of Housing

Affordable Housing: A number affordable housing options may be available for people with psychiatric or substance use disorders, physical disabilities, homeless individuals, low-income people and the elderly, however, these vary greatly by community and eligibility requirements. Agencies administering these programs include local, state and federal housing authorities, social service agencies and mental health or housing advocacy organizations.

Temporary Housing: This type of housing can serve as a bridge between homelessness and permanent housing for clients discharged from inpatient treatment facilities, hospitals or prison. Temporary housing arrangements include homeless shelters, some of which are specific (e.g. female domestic violence victims and children) and transitional housing programs arranged by treatment facilities and mental health agencies. A sober living house (halfway house) is a transitional living facility for those in recovery from drugs or alcohol. In many cases, similar behavioral therapies and services are offered as during inpatient treatment, albeit in a less formal setting.

Permanent Housing: Licensed care homes, assisted living facilities and nursing homes provide highly structured living for people with severe mental illness, disabilities or medical complications. Group homes and other types of supportive housing combine housing and services in an enclosed and supportive setting, however, they allow for more independence. Some offer 24/7 supervision, while others are partially supervised.

Every state has information on temporary housing, typically through housing or disability assistance bureaus. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has information on local homelessness assistance and preventing housing loss.

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More on Housing Services

People with mental illness and/or substance use disorders often have precarious housing situations, making them particularly vulnerable to homelessness. In January 2014, one in five people experiencing homelessness had a serious mental illness, with a similar percentage suffering from a chronic substance use disorder. A safe and secure place to live and access to services are essential to recovery. They enable people with mental illness and/or substance use disorders to live as independently as possible.

Important Factors

Affordability: Ideally, housing should not cost more than 30% of one’s income, otherwise an individual will have difficulty paying for other daily necessities. To meet housing costs, some people need additional financial assistance such as government-funded rental assistance or subsidies.

Independence: Housing should provide individuals the freedom to choose where and what type of housing they want. To a great extent, this is dictated by a person’s behavioral and physical capabilities and disabilities, but should be the least restrictive, most independent setting to match one’s needs. If a person has physical disabilities, ramps and other modifications need to be in place.

Discrimination-free: The Fair Housing Act bars discrimination in rental housing based on disability, therefore landlords and property owners cannot refuse to rent to a person because of a disability. Allowing reasonable accommodations and modifications to a dwelling to fit a disabled person’s needs is protected by federal law.

Types of Housing

Affordable Housing: A number affordable housing options may be available for people with psychiatric or substance use disorders, physical disabilities, homeless individuals, low-income people and the elderly, however, these vary greatly by community and eligibility requirements. Agencies administering these programs include local, state and federal housing authorities, social service agencies and mental health or housing advocacy organizations.

Temporary Housing: This type of housing can serve as a bridge between homelessness and permanent housing for clients discharged from inpatient treatment facilities, hospitals or prison. Temporary housing arrangements include homeless shelters, some of which are specific (e.g. female domestic violence victims and children) and transitional housing programs arranged by treatment facilities and mental health agencies. A sober living house (halfway house) is a transitional living facility for those in recovery from drugs or alcohol. In many cases, similar behavioral therapies and services are offered as during inpatient treatment, albeit in a less formal setting.

Permanent Housing: Licensed care homes, assisted living facilities and nursing homes provide highly structured living for people with severe mental illness, disabilities or medical complications. Group homes and other types of supportive housing combine housing and services in an enclosed and supportive setting, however, they allow for more independence. Some offer 24/7 supervision, while others are partially supervised.

Every state has information on temporary housing, typically through housing or disability assistance bureaus. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has information on local homelessness assistance and preventing housing loss.

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