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(564 results for Supported Housing)

Supported Housing

Supported housing (also called supportive housing) was originally conceived as an intervention for homeless people living with mental illness. In 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the HUD-VA Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program. From 2002 to 2007, an estimated 65,000 to 72,000 units of supportive housing were created in the U.S., half of which were targeted towards chronically homeless individuals, and 20% designated for homeless families. In many parts of the country, this concept has expanded to help individuals and families coping with trauma/abuse, addiction and chronic illness including HIV/AIDS, as well as elderly people in need of assistance.

Several types of supported housing are available, with varying levels of support. For example, supported housing can range from receiving help in one’s own home with tasks such as budgeting and accessing services – to living in a communal setting with resident support workers or therapists.

Three Basic Supported Housing Types

Support in your own home: In-home services can help clients in the following areas:
– Benefits
– Budgeting
– Maintaining tenancy
– Life skills (e.g. learning to cook)
– Accessing services such as healthcare, local activities, education/training, advocacy and sometimes emotional support
– Assistance performing household tasks, preparing meals and taking medication

Supported accommodation and group homes: Types of supported housing outside of the client’s own house include:

– Adult placement involves living in the home of a landlord or landlady who also provides support.
– Sheltered housing involves living in a block or group of flats serviced by a warden and sometimes support staff. Clients have a large degree of independence, although many also receive community care services.
– Group homes are self-contained flats where residents share a living room, bathroom and kitchen with other residents. In this type of situation, residents provide support to one another, although some homes offer additional support from staff.
– Therapeutic communities are similar to group homes, however, rehabilitation and communal living are emphasized. Individual and group therapy are encouraged and therapists may live on site.

Short-stay supported accommodation: The goal of this type of housing is to provide intensive short-term support for people who are either in crisis or who need interim services to help transition to independent living. Options include:

– Crisis houses provide intensive short-term support and are an alternative to hospitalization. The demand is high and these types of services are not available in every part of the U.S.
– Short-stay hostels provide temporary accommodation for people with specific needs. They focus on helping clients develop the skills necessary to live in a more independent setting.

Various studies have found supported housing to be a cost-effective means for preventing homelessness and helping clients transition to independent living situations.

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More on Supported Housing

Supported housing (also called supportive housing) was originally conceived as an intervention for homeless people living with mental illness. In 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the HUD-VA Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program. From 2002 to 2007, an estimated 65,000 to 72,000 units of supportive housing were created in the U.S., half of which were targeted towards chronically homeless individuals, and 20% designated for homeless families. In many parts of the country, this concept has expanded to help individuals and families coping with trauma/abuse, addiction and chronic illness including HIV/AIDS, as well as elderly people in need of assistance.

Several types of supported housing are available, with varying levels of support. For example, supported housing can range from receiving help in one’s own home with tasks such as budgeting and accessing services – to living in a communal setting with resident support workers or therapists.

Three Basic Supported Housing Types

Support in your own home: In-home services can help clients in the following areas:
– Benefits
– Budgeting
– Maintaining tenancy
– Life skills (e.g. learning to cook)
– Accessing services such as healthcare, local activities, education/training, advocacy and sometimes emotional support
– Assistance performing household tasks, preparing meals and taking medication

Supported accommodation and group homes: Types of supported housing outside of the client’s own house include:

– Adult placement involves living in the home of a landlord or landlady who also provides support.
– Sheltered housing involves living in a block or group of flats serviced by a warden and sometimes support staff. Clients have a large degree of independence, although many also receive community care services.
– Group homes are self-contained flats where residents share a living room, bathroom and kitchen with other residents. In this type of situation, residents provide support to one another, although some homes offer additional support from staff.
– Therapeutic communities are similar to group homes, however, rehabilitation and communal living are emphasized. Individual and group therapy are encouraged and therapists may live on site.

Short-stay supported accommodation: The goal of this type of housing is to provide intensive short-term support for people who are either in crisis or who need interim services to help transition to independent living. Options include:

– Crisis houses provide intensive short-term support and are an alternative to hospitalization. The demand is high and these types of services are not available in every part of the U.S.
– Short-stay hostels provide temporary accommodation for people with specific needs. They focus on helping clients develop the skills necessary to live in a more independent setting.

Various studies have found supported housing to be a cost-effective means for preventing homelessness and helping clients transition to independent living situations.

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